AA

Key Points

Download as a PDF
  • Pain post SCI has a significant effect of quality of life.
  • Post-SCI pain is common and often severe beginning relatively early post-injury.
  • Post-SCI pain is most commonly divided into neuropathic or musculoskeletal pain.
  • Massage may not be helpful for post-SCI neuropathic and musculoskeletal pain.
  • Osteopathy alone may not be helpful for post-SCI neuropathic pain.
  • Acupuncture may reduce post-SCI neuropathic and musculoskeletal pain.
  • Electrostimulation acupuncture is effective in improving neuropathic pain in SCI pain.
  • Regular exercise reduces post-SCI neuropathic and musculoskeletal pain.
  • A shoulder exercise protocol reduces post-SCI nociceptive shoulder pain intensity.
  • MAGIC wheels 2 gear wheelchair reduces nociceptive shoulder pain.
  • Hypnosis may reduce neuropathic and musculoskeletal pain intensity post SCI.
  • Biofeedback may reduce neuropathic and musculoskeletal pain intensity post SCI.
  • Cognitive behavioral therapy combined with pharmacological treatment may result in improvement in secondary outcomes among SCI individuals with chronic pain.
  • Cognitive-behavioral pain management programs alone do not alter post-SCI pain.
  • Visual imagery may reduce neuropathic pain post SCI.
  • Transcranial electrical stimulation is effective in reducing post SCI neuropathic pain.
  • Static field magnet may reduce nociceptive shoulder pain post SCI.
  • Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation may reduce pain at site of injury in patients with thoracic but not cervical injury.
  • Transcranial magnetic stimulation reduces post-SCI neuropathic pain.
  • Gabapentin and pregabalin improve neuropathic pain post SCI.
  • Combined osteopathy and pregabalin may improve pain post SCI.
  • Lamotrigine may improve neuropathic pain in incomplete spinal cord injury
  • Levetiracetam is not effective in reducing neuropathic pain post SCI.
  • Valproic acid does not reduce neuropathic pain post SCI.
  • Duloxetine may improve neuropathic pain post SCI
  • Trazodone does not reduce post-SCI neuropathic pain.
  • Lidocaine through a subarachnoid lumbar catheter and intravenous Ketamine improve post-SCI neuropathic pain short term.
  • Mexilitene does not improve SCI dysesthetic pain.
  • Intrathecal Baclofen improves musculoskeletal pain post SCI and may help dysethetic pain related to spasticity.
  • Motor point phenol block reduces spastic shoulder pain.
  • Botulinum toxin injections for focal spasticity improves pain.
  • Intravenous morphine reduces mechanical allodynia.
  • Tramadol reduces neuropathic pain.
  • Alfentanil reduces chronic pain post SCI.
  • Alfentanil is more effective in reducing wind up like pain post SCI than ketamine.
  • Oxycodone and anticonvuslants may improve neuropathic SCI pain.
  • Cannabinoids are a potential new treatment for post-SCI pain in need of further study.
  • Dronabinal is not effective in reducing pain post SCI.
  • Intrathecal Clonidine alone does not appear to provide pain relief although it may be helpful in combination with Intrathecal Morphine.
  • Topical capsaicin reduces post-SCI radicular pain.
  • Spinal cord stimulation may improve post-SCI neuropathic and musculoskeletal pain.
  • Dorsal longitudinal T-myelotomy procedures reduce pain post SCI.
  • DREZ surgical procedure reduces pain post SCI.